Do you know?

Why doesn't alcohol freeze?

Answer:Alcohol will freeze, but only at extremely low temperatures.
Water's freezing point is 0 degrees Celcius, but the freezing point of
ethanol (the alcohol you're talking about) is -114 degrees Celsius.
Ultra-low temperature freezers (which are the coldest you can buy) have
temperatures between -50 and -90 degrees Celcius. Your freezer at home most
likely has temperatures around -10 degrees Celcius. All these temperatures
are too warm for pure alcohol to freeze. That's why you can alcohol in your
freezer and it won't freeze.

How come we have hair on our bodies?

Answer:Humans are mammals -- just like cats, dogs, bats, elephants,
monkeys and foxes. Ever notice that mammals are pretty hairy animals?
That's because mammals have to stay warm -- and having a a hairy fur coat
helps. (Even though, depending upon what kind of mammal you are, you have to
work hard to keep your fur coat clean!) A fur coat provides great
insulation.

Additionally, if a mammal is scared, hair helps in looking big and fierce.
For example, if a cat is scared, a muscle attached to the base of each hair
can tug on it to make it stand on end. The result? The cat looks bigger, and
with hair standing on end, scarier!

It's unfortunate that humans just don't have enough hair to be terribly
useful. For the most part, hair ends up simply being something that makes
for a good or bad hair day. However, hair IS responsible for goosebumps
which occur when cold air or fright cause your hairs to stand upright making
little bumps as they do. Cool, huh?


What's the fastest animal on Earth?

Answer:According to the Guinness Book of World Records, peregrine
falcons have been known to dive at speeds in excess of 217 miles per hour!
Why do they do this? To kill other birds for food. Peregrine falcons, also
known as duck hawks, circle high in the sky, then tuck their wings in and
dive down on smaller birds like finches, pigeons, or gulls. With their
talons (claws) exposed, peregrines usually kill the other birds
instantaneously. They basically turn themselves into bird missiles --- which
can leave a cheetah or gazelle in the dust!

Where did the phrase "Nothing to sneeze at" come from?

Answer:According to the Guinness Book of World Records, peregrine
falcons have been known to dive at speeds in excess of 217 miles per hour!
Why do they do this? To kill other birds for food. Peregrine falcons, also
known as duck hawks, circle high in the sky, then tuck their wings in and
dive down on smaller birds like finches, pigeons, or gulls. With their
talons (claws) exposed, peregrines usually kill the other birds
instantaneously. They basically turn themselves into bird missiles --- which
can leave a cheetah or gazelle in the dust!

r: People in older times imagined that a sneeze cleared the mind. It
certainly gave them a feeling of exhilaration. Suddenly, 17th century Europe
caught a craze for sneezing. It was considered the right thing to do in good
society. Indeed, the more you sneezed, the more you proved yourself a member
of the privileged class.

To build up this new status symbol, all kinds of devices were used. It was
soon realized that snuff caused sneezing. Therefore everyone who was someone
carried with him a little box, containing a mixture of sneeze-producing
herbs or tobacco. By drawing an ample pinch of it into the nostrils, a
hearty sneeze resulted in no time. Of course only the rich and idle had time
to sneeze or could afford snuff. Hence the self-induced sneeze became
synonymous with aristocratic living. If you were able to sneeze 'on call,'
you showed audibly your status in society.

But one matter had still to be decided. Just to sneeze haphazardly was not
good enough. There had to be a special occasion. Soon sneezing became part
of men's conversation. You indulged in it whenever you wanted to show your
disapproval of anything said or, even more so, your lack of interest in the
matter discussed. A sneeze was an unmistakable way of saying politely 'you
bore me.' Consequently and logically, anything 'not to be sneezed at' was
something really worthwhile."

Where did the phrase "Bleeding Heart" come from?

Answer: You may have heard this saying, but don't worry! It doesn't
mean that a person's heart is bleeding; it only means that a person is
extremely generous and giving to others.

Do you know any "bleeding hearts"? They could be like the elderly neighbor
down the street who feeds all the stray animals in your neighborhood, or
your friend's mom who donates all of her free time to charities at your
school or in your town. Someone who's called a "bleeding heart" often feels
compassion or sorry for people who are less fortunate, like people who don't
have jobs or homes or who may be sick.

Where did this saying come from? The term originated in America in
the 20thcentury. Some people worried that the government wasn't doing
enough to help

people who needed assistance, and these "bleeding hearts" took it upon
themselves to help them. They got their nickname from other people who
believed that people shouldn't rely on welfare and charity.

Where did the phrase "Kick the bucket" come from?

Answer: The wooden frame that slaughtered animals were hung from is
known as a bucket. The death spasms of the animals caused them to kick the
bucket. So people used the phrase 'kick the bucket' when someone died.

Who created the alphabet?

Answer: Alphabets have been around in some form for at least four
millennia! Think of Egyptian hieroglyphics, for example. No one knows for
sure what the first alphabet was. About 1500 BC, some Eastern Mediterranian
Semites invented the alphabet from which ours is probably descended. It was
made up of consonants. Later, the ancient Greeks adapted the Semitic
alphabet for their own use, and they added vowels. The alphabet we use
today, called Modern Roman, evolved from these.

Who created the globe?

Answer: The first globe was created by a German mapmaker named Martin
Behaim in 1492. He was inspired by the discoveries of Nicolaus Copernicus, a
Polish astronomer who suggested that the Earth and its surrounding planets
were round, not flat. He also proposed that the Earth was not the center of
the Universe, as many people thought. Behaim called his globe an "Erdapfel,"
or "Earth Apple."

Was the Underground Railroad a real railroad?

Answer: The Underground Railroad was not a real railroad. It is in no
way associated with any kind of train or tracks. Also, the Underground
Railroad was not underground. It was an organized network of routes that
helped slaves escape from slavery to freedom in the 1800's that were
described using railroad terms. 'Passengers' were runaway slaves fleeing
from the South. Their guides were called 'conductors' and they led them from
one 'station' to another. Escape routes stretched from the southern slave
states into the North and on to Canada. Fugitives usually traveled secretly
at night, and were hidden in 'safe houses', barns, and haylofts in the day.
Thousands of antislavery campaigners, both black and white, risked their
lives to operate the railway, and it operate d for many years before and
during the Civil War.

Why are primary colors called primary?

Answer: The colors red, blue, and green are called primary because by
mixing just these three colors you can create all the colors in the
spectrum. Most of the colors that you see are mixtures of two or more
colors. The word "primary" is an adjective used to describe anything that
occurs first, or is most important. It makes sense that we call these colors
primary, since all other colors come from them!

Why are there different money systems in the different countries?

Answer: When countries are formed, most prefer to form their own
monetary system so that their economy is not dependent on the strength or
weakness of some other country's economy. Not all countries have done this,
though. The Argentine peso has been linked to the American dollar, and
several South American countries have been considering adopting the American
dollar as their own currency, as a way to introduce economic stability.
Another example of the consolidation of currencies for the purpose of
economic stability (and lower costs for international trading) is the
European Union's euro.


Why is the American flag called "Old Glory"?

Answer: Captain Stephen Driver of Salem, Massachusetts, first used the
words "Old Glory" about the American flag. In 1831, as he was leaving on his
ship, friends gave him a beautiful new American flag. When it was unfurled
in the ocean breeze, Captain Driver exclaimed, "Old Glory!" and that flag
itself became known as Old Glory. In 1837, Captain Driver retired to
Tennessee, and when that state seceded from the Union in the Civil War,
rebels tried to find and destroy the Old Glory flag. Luckily, the Captain
hid Old Glory inside the seams of his bed quilt, so the rebels never found
it! In 1862, Captain Driver raised Old Glory over the state capitol to
celebrate the Union's triumph, and ever since, people have called the
American flag "Old Glory."

When was the first-ever movie made?

Answer: The world's very first moving picture was filmed in 1888. A
Frenchman named Louis-Augustin Le Prince, who lived in England, created a
movie camera and made a three-second film of the horse-and-buggy traffic on
a busy road. He had a patent for his machine, but he only showed the film to
a few people, so the public didn't know about it for years. In 1894, Thomas
Edison invented the Kinetoscope, which showed motion pictures inside a
peep-show type of cabinet. A Kinetoscope parlor opened in New York that year
and showed movies of stage and circus acts.

Who invented the Internet?

Answer: As it turns out, there is no one inventor of the Internet. The
Internet was created in the 1960s as a huge network linking big university
and government computers. The science behind the Internet was invented
during the Cold War, when the United States was in competition against
Russia for weapons and technology. So the Internet is actually pretty
old--around forty years. In fact, email has been around since 1972! But it
wasn't until 1989 that Tim Berners-Lee, a scientist at the European
Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva, proposed the World Wide Web,
which is what you're reading this article on now.

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